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James Buckwalter

J Buckwalter.jpg
Associate Professor, ECE


Email: jfbuckwalter@ucsd.edu
Office: Jacobs Hall/EBU 1, Room 5607
Phone: (858) 534-4253


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Biography

James Buckwalter received the B.S. degree with honors from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1999, the M.S. degree from UC Santa Barbara in 2001, and his Ph.D. from Caltech in 2006. He worked as a research scientist at Telcordia Technologies (formerly Bellcore) from 1999 through 2001 and at Luxtera in 2006. In 2006, he joined the faculty of the UC San Diego as an assistant professor and was promoted to associate professor in 2012. His research group is conducted in the area of high-speed integrated circuit design and receives funding from a variety of companies and government agencies. He consults for industrial and legal clients. He serves as a reviewer for a number of IEEE journals including the Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, Microwave and Wireless Components Letters, Transactions on Circuits and Systems I and II, and Journal on Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics. From 2007-2009, he was an associate editor of the Transactions on Circuits and Systems II. He also serves on the technical paper review committee of the International Microwave Symposium. He was awarded the DARPA Young Faculty Award in 2007 and the NSF CAREER Award in 2011.

Research Interests

Integrated circuit design of RF and millimeter-wave communication systems and opto-electronic interfaces for high-speed sampling and wireline communication.

Projects

Professor Buckwalter leads the High-speed Integrated Circuits Group at UCSD. His research investigates topics including wideband wireless communication for RF and millimeter-wave bands and broadband circuit design for wireline and opto-electronic interfaces. This research advances the state-of-the-art in high-speed communication systems by leveraging the latest developments in silicon-based circuit processing for system performance breakthroughs. A variety of trade-offs must be established for a communication circuit and these often include speed, power consumption, and cost. Through careful theoretical analysis of communication bottlenecks, we invent new circuit solutions that utilize a combination of analog and digital circuitry and verify these inventions through an integrated circuit implementation in a silicon or silicon-germanium process. Bringing high-speed communication to the hands of billions of people worldwide enables significant social change.