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Journal Club Seminars

Contents

The Journal Club talks take place on Fridays from 12:00 - 1:00pm in SERF 383. Generally pizza and soda are served.

The Journal Club is crafted to be a very informal and friendly environment where graduate students can present talks on any subject of interest to them, be it a recent journal paper, their own research work, or any topic.

Everyone is welcome to attend.

If you are interested in giving a talk, please contact: Jung-Tsung Li

Past journal club talks are listed in the sidebar by year.

Upcoming Journal Club Seminars

WINTER 2018


February 22, 2019

 Revewing "AGN wind scaling relations and the co-evolution of black holes and
galaxies"

Gene Leung (12:00-12:30)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS
OPEN TIME SLOT (12:30-1:00)



March 1, 2019

I-Da Chiang (12:00-12:30)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS
OPEN TIME SLOT (12:30-1:00)



March 8, 2019

 "Paleolithic Astronomy"

Bernie Taylor (12:00-1:00)

 Naturalist and author Bernie Taylor will present an origin to modern astronomy in European Paleolithic caves from 34,000 years ago that connects with global myths of hunter-gatherers and the ancients in the Mediterranean region. Taylor proposes that astronomy was developed to pass on timeless myths and cultural traditions among prehistoric hunter-gathers. He will explore deep sources to Ptolemy's Almagest and the hero's journey monomyth as popularized by Joseph Campbell, and test precession against the Paleolithic record.

Bernie Taylor is an independent naturalist and author whose research explores the mythological connections and biological knowledge among prehistoric, indigenous and ancient peoples. His works in these areas include Biological Time (2004) and Before Orion: Finding the Face of the Hero (2017). Before Orion is premised on Joseph’s Campbell’s hero's journey monomyth that is at the core of stories worldwide among indigenous peoples, the ancients, and our modern society. Before Orion explores a deeper root for this monomyth by looking at how hunter-gatherers viewed themselves within the natural and spiritual worlds through Paleolithic cave art from 40,000 years ago. Taylor proposes that select cave paintings are fundamental pieces in the human journey to self-realization, the foundation of written language, and a record of biological knowledge that irrevocably impacted some of the artistic styles, religious practices, and stories that are still with us. Taylor addresses a profound archaeological elephant in the room by opening up an uncharted place in our history, which points to the cultural ancestors of mankind in western North Africa. Before Orion will change the idea of who you think you are.



March 15, 2019

Logan Howe (12:00-12:30)
Physics Graduate Student
UCSD-CASS
OPEN TIME SLOT (12:30-1:00)